US rejects Crimea vote, cites Russian intimidation – wistv.com – Columbia, South …

By MATTHEW LEE
AP Diplomatic Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) – President Barack Obama told Russian President Vladimir Putin on Sunday that Crimea’s vote to secede from Ukraine and join Russia “would never be recognized” by the United States, as he and other top U.S. officials warned Moscow against making further military moves toward southern and eastern Ukraine.

The two leaders spoke after residents in Crimea voted overwhelmingly in favor of the split in a referendum that the United States, European Union and others say violates the Ukrainian constitution and international law and took place in the strategic peninsula under duress of Russian military intervention. Putin maintained that the vote was legal and consistent with the right of self-determination, according to the Kremlin. But the White House said Obama reminded Putin that the U.S. and its allies in Europe would impose sanctions against Russia should it annex Crimea. U.S. and EU sanctions are expected to be announced Monday.

In the call, which came amid a heightened exchange of decidedly Cold War-style rhetoric between East and West, Obama urged Putin to pursue a diplomatic de-escalation of the crisis, support the Ukraine government’s plans for political reform, return its troops in Crimea to their bases, and halt advances into Ukrainian territory and military build-ups along Ukraine’s borders.

Obama told Putin that “a diplomatic resolution cannot be achieved while Russian military forces continue their incursions into Ukrainian territory and that the large-scale Russian military exercises on Ukraine’s borders only exacerbate the tension,” the White House said in a statement.

Even before official results of the referendum were announced, the White House denounced the vote, saying “no decisions should be made about the future of Ukraine without the Ukrainian government” and noting that Russia had rejected the deployment of international monitors in Crimea to ensure the rights of ethnic Russians there were protected.

“Russia has spurned those calls as well as outreach from the Ukrainian government and instead has escalated its military intervention into Crimea and initiated threatening military exercises on Ukraine’s eastern border,” the White House said, calling those actions “dangerous and destabilizing,”

But with no military response envisioned, and with U.S. and EU sanctions apparently foregone conclusions, the Obama administration slightly shifted its focus to keeping Russia from encroachment into Ukraine beyond Crimea, where it has a large naval base.

U.S. officials warned that any Russia moves on east and south Ukraine would be a grave escalation requiring additional responses.

In a call with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, Secretary of State John Kerry expressed “strong concerns” about Russian military activities in the southern Ukrainian region of Kherson, where Russian troops appeared Saturday, and about “continuing provocations” in cities in east Ukraine, the State Department said.

Kerry “made clear that this crisis can only be resolved politically and that as Ukrainians take the necessary political measures going forward, Russia must reciprocate by pulling forces back to base and addressing the tensions and concerns about military engagement,” it said.

He also urged Russia “to support efforts by Ukrainians across the spectrum to address power sharing and decentralization through a constitutional reform process that is broadly inclusive and protects the rights of minorities,” including ethnic Russians, Russian speakers and others in the former Soviet republic whom Russia says it is concerned about, the department said.

The call was the second between Kerry and Lavrov since they had six hours of unsuccessful face-to-face talks on London on Friday.

A senior State Department official said Lavrov’s willingness to discuss Ukraine political reforms was positive. But the official stressed that the Russian military escalation was of “greatest concern” and must be reversed. The official spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss the private conversation.

White House senior adviser Dan Pfeiffer said earlier Sunday that in addition to sanctions, Russia would lose influence and standing in the world if Putin doesn’t back down.

“President Putin has a choice about what he’s going to do here. Is he going to continue to further isolate himself, further hurt his economy, further diminish Russian influence in the world, or is he going to do the right thing?” Pfeiffer said.

U.S. and European officials have said they plan to announce sanctions against Russia, including visa bans and potential asset freezes, on Monday if Putin does not shift course.

But Putin and other Russians have shown no sign they are willing to back down.

Meanwhile, members of Congress said Sunday they were ready to enact tough sanctions on various Russian leaders, although $1 billion in loan guarantees to help the Ukrainian economy is on hold while Congress is on a break.

“President Putin has started a game of Russian roulette, and I think the United States and the West have to be very clear in their response because he will calculate about how far he can go,” said Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

The top Republican on the committee, Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee, said the U.S. and Europe were entering a “defining moment” in their relationship with Russia.

“Putin will continue to do this. He did it in Georgia a few years ago. He’s moved into Crimea, and he will move into other places unless we show that long-term resolve.”

Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy of Connecticut, just back from meetings in Ukraine, said Ukrainians he talked to said war could occur if Russia attempts to annex more territory. They indicated that “if Russia really does decide to move beyond Crimea, it’s going to be bloody and the fight may be long,” Murphy said.

Pfeiffer spoke on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” Menendez and Corker appeared on “Fox News Sunday.” Murphy was on ABC’s “This Week.”

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

3 killed in small airplane crash in SC neighborhood

HARTSVILLE, SC (WIS) -

Investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board will be in Hartsville for several days, working to piece together what happened leading up to a plane crash that killed three people Saturday.

Witnesses told investigators the aircraft was flying for most of the afternoon before crashing.

“There are a number of things that we have been looking at today including the weather conditions at the time, the systems on the aircraft which includes a flight control system,” NTSB Air Safety Investigator Todd Gunther said. “Also the landing gear system on the aircraft and the electronics on the aircraft; we are also looking at the structure on the airplane to make a determination whether or not the aircraft was complete and in one piece when it came to rest here across from us.”

Authorities received the call that the plane had crashed around 7 p.m. between two houses about one mile southeast of the Hartsville Regional Airport.

The plane struck two trees and caught on fire after impact, Gunther said.

Darlington County Coroner Todd Hardee identified the three men as 29-year-old Joseph Melton Loflin II and his father-in-law, 61-year-old George Thomas Rogers, both of Society Hill; and 75-year-old Leslie Bradshaw of Hartsville.

“It’s a devastating loss to us,” Hardee said. “These were wonderful people, just fine pillars of our community. It’s a devastating loss, not only for the family but for us and for this community.”

According to records from the Federal Aviation Administration, the airplane was a fixed wing single-engine Lancair IV-P that was built from a kit and registered to Rogers.

“What we know so far is it is an experimental amateur built aircraft licensed by the Federal Aviation Administration in the experimental category,” Gunther said. “It was built by the builder, he is however not the original owner. It originally started as a kit owned by somebody else which he purchased and completed.”

The experimental designation has been in existence for more than five decades, according to the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA).

“It defines aircraft’s that are used for non-commercial, recreational purposes such as education or personal use,” according to the EAA. “Under FAA regulations, if individuals build at least 51 percent of an aircraft, it can be registered in the amateur-built/homebuilt category. They are available in kits, where some of the airplane is already fabricated, or plans where the builder manufactures all the parts and assembles them.”

Currently, more than 32,000 amateur-built/homebuilt aircraft’s are licensed by the FAA, according to the EAA.

Gunther said those on the plane were communicating with cell phones and reported possible mechanical issues before the crash.

“There was no communication with any air traffic control facility however, there was some communication with other individuals with cellular telephone,” Gunther said. “Those communications were regarding a possible problem with the landing gear on the aircraft and that’s something we are still sorting out.”

Gunther said investigators will be on the site for three days to do field work, and then they will return to Washington D.C. where a preliminary report will be released in 7 to 10 days.

A final report will be released in nine months to a year.

Copyright 2014 WIS. All rights reserved.

Ennis’ 35-footer keeps No. 1 Syracuse unbeaten

PITTSBURGH (AP) – Seven games separate No. 1 Syracuse from an undefeated regular season. Maybe it will be a lucky seven after a buzzer-beater kept the Orange on the course to perfection.

Tyler Ennis took the inbounds pass with 4.4 seconds left and dribbled up court, weaving through Pitt’s defense. He had the option of shooting or passing to Trevor Cooney.

The freshman guard decided to shoot.

It was the right decision.

Ennis made a 35-footer at the buzzer and Syracuse remained unbeaten with a 58-56 victory over No. 25 Pitt on Wednesday night.

“I saw someone ran over to Trevor and I just had to beat one guy,” Ennis said. “I knew they weren’t going to let Trevor get it. I just had to get some space. I knew I could get open for a second.”

Pitt senior forward Talib Zanna called it a “lucky” shot. Syracuse coach Jim Boeheim disagreed.

“It’s a little lucky, but I didn’t hear Duke saying they were lucky when they drove the length of the court and made an off-balance 3 to tie the game,” Boeheim said, alluding an overtime victory for his team over the Blue Devils at the Carrier Dome on Feb. 1. “I didn’t hear anybody say they were lucky. You have to do it. You have to make the play. The ball goes in. That’s not luck. He took the shot and he made the shot. He didn’t throw it up from half court or three-quarters court. He dribbled it up. He had a purpose. He got up in the air and took a good shot, and it went in. It happens sometimes, but he was poised to do it.”

Poise under pressure is a good way to describe Syracuse this season. The Orange (24-0, 11-0 ACC) and Wichita State are the lone undefeated teams in Division I.

The road to a perfect 31-0 regular season is not easy for Syracuse, however. After home games against North Carolina State and Boston College, the Orange have three consecutive road games, including trips to No. 8 Duke and No. 17 Virginia.

Zanna, who led Pitt (20-5, 8-4) with 16 points and 14 rebounds, hit two free throws after being fouled on a layup attempt to give the Panthers a 56-55 lead before Ennis’ winner.

Pitt coach Jamie Dixon called a timeout after the free throws to set his defense. That also allowed Syracuse to draw up a play designed for its fearless freshman.

“We guarded it about as well as you could guard it,” Dixon said. “He made about a 40-footer. We did what we were supposed to do. If we had to do it again. … We did the right things.

“They were going to get a shot off. He made it, and he made a tough one. We knew he’d have the ball and would be the guy. We had two guys on him. He hit the shot. Our guys defended, and he hit a shot.”

It was Pitt’s first loss at home to a top-five team in the 12-year history of the Petersen Events Center. The Panthers had been 9-0 against top-five teams and 13-1 against teams ranked in the top 10.

C.J. Fair led Syracuse with 14 points.

Pitt had a 54-48 lead with less than 2 minutes remaining, but Fair made a 3-pointer with 1:40 to go. He then hit a jumper to make it 54-53 with 51 seconds left. After Pitt missed on the other end, Ennis made two free throws with 10 seconds left to give the Orange the lead.

“C.J. hadn’t hit a 3 all game. He hadn’t hit the rim, and he makes a 3 and then he hits a pretty tough pull-up to give us a chance,” Boeheim said. “Those were big plays and you have to be a special player to make those plays.”

Pitt led 27-24 at halftime and built its lead to nine in the early stages of the second half when Lamar Patterson made a 3-pointer to make it 37-28 with 15 minutes remaining.

Syracuse stormed back with a 17-8 run and tied it on Cooney’s 3-pointer with 6:53 to go, but Pitt regained control after Zanna converted a three-point play and freshman Jamel Artis sank two free throws for a 50-45 lead.

But it was all Syracuse after that. Pitt’s only points in the final 1:59 came from Zanna’s two free throws, and the Panthers were outscored 10-3 in the final 1:59.

Syracuse had to play without backup center Baye Moussa Keita, who sat out with a sprained knee. That forced sophomore forward Jerami Grant into duty as the backup center behind Rakeem Christmas.

Pitt had injury issues of its own. Senior forward and leading scorer Lamar Patterson had his right thumb wrapped for a second consecutive game. After going 1 for 9 in his previous outing against Virginia Tech, Patterson scored 13 points.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Algeria: Plane crash kills 77 but 1 man survives – wistv.com – Columbia, South …

ALGIERS, Algeria (AP) – In a Feb. 11 story about the crash that day of an Algerian military transport plane, The Associated Press erroneously identified the type of plane involved in a previous crash of an Algerian military plane in France. The plane that crashed in November 2012 was an EADS CASA C-295, not a Lockheed Martin C-130.

On Feb 12, a day after the crash, there was a dispute over the death toll. An Algerian civil defense spokesman reduced the death toll to 76 with one survivor but the Algerian military still insisted that 77 people died and one survived. There was no immediate way to rectify the discrepancy.

A corrected version of the story is below:

Algeria: Plane crash kills 76 but 1 man survives

Defense ministry: Algerian military plane crash kills 76 people but 1 soldier survives

By AOMAR OUALI and PAUL SCHEMM

Associated Press

ALGIERS, Algeria (AP) – An Algerian military transport plane slammed into a mountain Tuesday in the country’s rugged eastern region, killing at least 76 people and leaving just one survivor, Algerian officials said.

Air traffic controllers lost radio and radar contact with the U.S.-built C-130 Hercules turboprop just before noon and dispatched helicopters to try to find it. The plane was discovered in pieces on Mount Fortas near the town of Ain Kercha, 50 kilometers (30 miles) southeast of Constantine, the main city in eastern Algeria.

The plane was heading to Constantine from the southern Saharan city of Tamanrasset, which has a massive military presence due to its proximity to the country’s unstable southern borders. It was at least 24 years old, according to sales information supplied by its maker, Lockheed Martin Corp.

In its statement, the military blamed poor weather for the crash.

“Unfavorable weather conditions and storms accompanied by snow in the region were behind the crash,” the defense ministry said.

The death toll for the crash has varied significantly. Algerian government officials and Algerian state media had originally reported the plane had 99 passengers. Later Tuesday, the defense ministry said the death toll was 77, with one survivor. On Wednesday, a civil defense spokesman reduced the death toll to 76 but the military stuck to its figure of 77 dead. There was no immediate way to rectify the discrepancy.

The lone survivor – a soldier – suffered head injuries and was treated at a nearby military facility before being flown to the military hospital in Algiers, a retired Algerian intelligence officer told The Associated Press. He spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the press.

Civil defense officials at the snowy crash site said the plane broke into three parts and women and children were among the dead. Military transports in Algeria routinely carry not only soldiers but military families and sometimes even other civilians if space is available.

Commander Farid Nechad, who was coordinating recovery efforts, told the AP that 55 bodies had been recovered so far but conditions at the crash site were difficult.

The presidency announced a three-day period of mourning, calling the soldiers who had died “martyrs for the country.”

Lockheed Martin’s hulking C-130 Hercules transport, born out of the experiences of the 1950-53 Korean War, has been used by air forces all over the world to help fight wars or save lives in humanitarian situations.

Lockheed Martin confirmed that it sold C-130s to Algeria from 1981 to 1990 and said if Algerian authorities asked, the company would work with them to investigate Tuesday’s crash. It did not release specific information on the age of the plane.

In 2003, 10 people died when an Algerian Air Force C-130 crashed after an engine caught fire shortly after it took off from an air base near Boufarik, according to the Aviation Safety Network’s database.

The worst plane crash in Algerian history occurred in 2003, when 102 people were killed after a civilian airliner crashed at the end of the runway in Tamanrasset. There was also a single survivor in that crash.

Sole survivors of large plane crashes are extremely rare, said Ky Dickens of Chicago, director and co-producer of a documentary on such survivors. Dickens identified 15 sole survivors around the world, limiting her search to commercial planes carrying more than 40 people.

Many sole survivors are either children or a member of the flight crew – a flight attendant or pilot, Dickens said.

___

Schemm reported from Rabat. Joshua Freed in Minneapolis, Joan Lowy in Washington and Karim Kebir in Algiers, Algeria, also contributed.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Algerian plane crash claims 102; 1 survivor – wistv.com – Columbia, South …

By AOMAR OUALI and PAUL SCHEMM
Associated Press

ALGIERS, Algeria (AP) – An Algerian military transport plane slammed into a mountain Tuesday in the country’s rugged eastern region, killing 77 people and leaving just one survivor, the defense ministry said.

Air traffic controllers lost radio and radar contact with the U.S.-built C-130 Hercules turboprop just before noon and dispatched helicopters to try to find it. The plane was discovered in pieces on Mount Fortas near the town of Ain Kercha, 50 kilometers (30 miles) southeast of Constantine, the main city in eastern Algeria.

The plane was heading to Constantine from the southern Saharan city of Tamanrasset, which has a massive military presence due to its proximity to the country’s unstable southern borders. It was at least 24 years old, according to sales information supplied by its maker, Lockheed Martin Corp.

The plane carried 74 passengers and four crew members, the military said in its statement, blaming poor weather for the crash.

Earlier in the day, Algerian government officials and Algerian state media had reported that the plane had 99 passengers, making for a much higher death toll.

The lone survivor – a soldier – suffered head injuries and was treated at a nearby military facility before being flown to the military hospital in Algiers, a retired Algerian intelligence officer told The Associated Press. He spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the press.

Civil defense officials at the snowy crash site said the plane broke into three parts and women and children were among the dead. Military transports in Algeria routinely carry not only soldiers but military families and sometimes even other civilians, if space is available.

Commander Farid Nechad, who was coordinating recovery efforts, told the AP that 55 bodies had been recovered so far but conditions at the crash site were difficult.

“Unfavorable weather conditions and storms accompanied by snow in the region were behind the crash,” the defense ministry said.

The presidency announced a three-day period of mourning, calling the soldiers who had died “martyrs for the country.”

Lockheed Martin’s hulking C-130 Hercules transport, born out of the experiences of the 1950-53 Korean War, has been used by air forces all over the world to help fight wars or save lives in humanitarian situations.

Lockheed Martin confirmed that it sold C-130s to Algeria from 1981 to 1990 and said if Algerian authorities asked, the company would work with them to investigate Tuesday’s crash. It did not release specific information on the age of the plane.

In other crashes involving similar planes, six people died in November 2012 when an Algerian Air Force C-130 crashed into a hillside in France, according to the Aviation Safety Network’s database. In 2003, 10 people died when an Algerian Air Force C-130 crashed after an engine caught fire shortly after it took off from an air base near Boufarik, Algeria, according to the database.

The worst plane crash in Algerian history occurred in 2003, when 102 people were killed after a civilian airliner crashed at the end of the runway in Tamanrasset. There was also a single survivor in that crash.

Sole survivors of large plane crashes are extremely rare, said Ky Dickens of Chicago, director and co-producer of a documentary on such survivors. Dickens, who began research for her film in 2010, identified 15 sole survivors around the world. She limited her search to commercial planes carrying more than 40 people.

Many sole survivors are either children or a member of the flight crew – a flight attendant or pilot, Dickens said.

___

Schemm reported from Rabat. Joshua Freed in Minneapolis, Joan Lowy in Washington and Karim Kebir in Algiers, Algeria, also contributed.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Behind the scenes support makes Palmetto Thunder more realistic

Behind the Scenes Support Makes Palmetto Thunder More Realistic
Sgt. Brad Mincey

South Carolina Army National Guard soldiers assisted Horry County civil authorities during Palmetto Thunder at Bucksport Landing near Conway, S.C. Feb. 1 in preparation for emergency situations like this were they were simulating casualties from a plane crash. The S.C. Guard regularly trains to assist other state agencies during natural disasters and emergencies. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. Brad Mincey/Released)

CONWAY, S.C.— Moulage gashes, cuts, compound fractures and bleeding, along with the moans and wails of the simulated casualties, all added up to an intense training scenario for soldiers in the S.C. National Guard when they joined civil authorities during a mock commercial airliner crash exercise led by Horry County Emergency Operations, Feb. 1.

Throughout the exercise, police, medics and other first responders reacted to a variety of injuries suffered after a simulated airliner crashed on approach to Myrtle Beach International Airport. These mock casualties then had to be inspected, assessed and triaged. To make these injuries more realistic, several citizens from Horry County used makeup, prosthetics and other moulage techniques to simulate realistic injuries.

“We hope that we never have an airplane crash,” said Rick Lab, with the Human Resources Department in Horry County. “But just like a firefighter trains to fight fires with the hopes of never having to go to one, we want to train for any possibility. We want to train as realistically as possible. It makes a big difference when you see someone with a pipe sticking out of their stomach, you know they can not walk themselves to triage. The realism we can add to the training changes how the injured act and how those responding react.”

To ensure readiness and synergize the relationships of the S.C. National Guard and first responders, conducting training with civil authorities in areas around the state in a variety of exercise scenarios, such as during a plane crash, is critical.

“In today’s world, tragic accidents occur, such as the one simulated in this exercise and they must be responded to quickly and in coordination with many agencies,” said Maj. Gen. Robert E. Livingston, the adjutant general of South Carolina. “The exercise validates our life saving procedures and identifies an area for improvement so that is we are faced with a sudden and devastating event like this, we can carry out our mission and safeguard our citizens.”

This particular exercise teamed military police, engineers, water purifying teams and many other support units with civilian emergency responders, police, firemen as well as the Red Cross and the State Guard.

They were spread across Horry County reacting to different scenarios and responding to different emergencies, which focused on a commercial airliner that crashed southwest of Myrtle Beach Airport. And while one group was looking for survivors at the crash and triaging the injured, another group was conducting bridging exercises to span a river. All of this training ensures the Guard and other groups are ready to react to any situation and provide support for the citizens they serve.

The recent cold-weather snap South Carolina citizens experienced was a prime example of the types of situations where the South Carolina National Guard and local and state elements work together to assist the populace. Throughout the year, these groups have worked together to prepare for the eventuality of assisting motorists stuck on the highway, help rebuild after a hurricane or assist during another disaster.

Several days prior to the Palmetto Thunder, Lab and two other colleagues created cards for each person who was going to be injured. These cards described injuries that ranged from minor to major to deceased. The victims had to play the role given them, and the medics and other responders had to look at them, assess what was wrong and triage those involved in the crash.

Rather than just having a card to read that said, “this person has a laceration on the forehead,” the medics could actually see what was wrong because of the moulage work done by the makeup effects team.

“When we do this, it makes the training more realistic,” said Frank Russell, Horry County Procurement Office, who has been doing special effects makeup since he was a teenager. “And it gives them a better idea of situations that they might encounter.”

Although this was his first time being involved in creating injures with special effects makeup with the county, Russell is already looking forward to the next exercise.

“Horry County has a very active Emergency Operations Center [EOC] program and we constantly improve the processes and procedures,” said Russell.

Although some of the volunteers have had some experience with special effects makeup, Russell has loved and crafted his skill since childhood. His interest in special effects began when he and a group of friends began working in a magic shop, which was the only place he could find the materials he needed to create the special effects.

“Our group was kind of like the guys on the TV show Big Bang Theory,” said Russell. “We were into movies, costumes, special effects and comics. Back in the 80s, there weren’t many costume shops in the area except for the magic shop where we worked on the boulevard, so we were kind of at the forefront of special effects in this area.”

Though they didn’t have TV shows like “Face Off” or websites like “YouTube” to guide and influence them as the youth of today have, like many children of the 70s and 80s certain cultural elements provided the inspiration and direction they needed.

“We were there in the beginning and were influenced by the things we saw in movies like ‘Star Wars’,” Russell said. “And then there was ‘An American Werewolf in London’ where you had a guy transform from a man to a wolf using latex appliances. We got to see that and those things really influenced us.”

According to Russell, what keeps him involved with creating special effects is that he has never grown up.

“I really like the behind the scenes stuff,” said Russell. “I am fascinated by how things are done and how they are made.”

In addition to those who spend months in the planning and preparations of these exercises, it’s the behind-the-scenes people that help make the training and interactions between the Guard and state authorities so successful and realistic.

“I think it went really well this time,” said Russell. “I would have liked the weather to have been better and to have had a little more time to put the prosthetics on. But we took care of nearly 30 people in about two hours.”

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This work, Behind the scenes support makes Palmetto Thunder more realistic, by SGT Brad Mincey, identified by DVIDS, is free of known copyright restrictions under U.S. copyright law.

1 student shot to death outside SC State dorm

ORANGEBURG, S.C. (AP) – A student was shot and killed Friday outside an on-campus dormitory at South Carolina State University, and police were looking for four men who left campus.

Brandon Robinson, 20, died not long after he was shot outside of the Hugine Suites around 1:30 p.m., authorities said. The gunmen left campus before police could catch them, but authorities decided to lock down the campus so they could not return, said University Police Chief Mernard Clarkson.

“Our students are secure and safe as we keep looking for these individuals,” Clarkson said.

Clarkson said police haven’t figured out what led to the shooting. He said his officers know one person they want to talk to, but he wasn’t ready to release a name.

The shooting shocked the entire campus, university President Thomas Elzey said. Grief counselors will be brought in to talk to students and staff.

“We, again, are extraordinarily sad about this. He was a very nice young man. And it hurts. It hurts us all,” Elzey said, trying to hold back tears.

Elzey said South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley offered any help the school needed.

The university lifted its lockdown Friday evening, but Clarkson said the school was letting traffic in and out of campus through only one gate.

South Carolina State also was the site of a fatal shooting in 2011, when police said three men met on campus for a drug deal. A student, 22-year-old Jonathan Bailey, was killed.

Friday’s fatal shooting happened three days after authorities said a Purdue University student shot and stabbed a fellow student to death in a classroom.

South Carolina State University is a historically black university with about 3,200 students in Orangeburg, about 40 miles south of Columbia.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Crash cleared on 17 Bypass just south of SC 544 – WBTW

SOCASTEE, SC -

A crash with a reported entrapment happened around 12:40 pm on Friday afternoon along US 17 Bypass.

The crash involved a van in a ditch in front of Hardee’s at Queens Harbor Blvd, which is just south of SC 544/Dick Pond Road.

Northbound traffic was affected in the area.

The crash was cleared by 1:30 pm

SC police officer out of hospital after being involved in deadly crash – WBTW

BISHOPVILLE, SC -

A Bishopville police officer injured in car collision Friday has been released from the hospital, WLTX reported.

Corporal Roniea Conyers, 35, is now resting and recovering at home, Bishopville Police Chief Calvin Collins said Sunday.

The crash happened just before 11 p.m. Friday, Conyer’s patrol vehicle and another car collided on U.S. 15 in Sumter County near the Lee County line, the SC Highway Patrol says.

The driver of the other vehicle, 25-year-old Vincent Jackson, died in the collision. Conyers was taken to Tuomey Regional for treatment.

“I would like to extend my condolences to the Jackson family concerning this tragic event,” Chief Collins said Sunday at a news conference.

Bishopville police confirm Conyers, who’s been with the department for five years, was responding to a call and had her lights on, but no sirens.

The South Carolina Highway Patrol is investigating the circumstances leading up to the collision. Collins says his department is also conducting an internal review of the situation; however, because it is, they could not offer any other details on the type of call Conyers was responding to.

Conyers is on paid administrative leave while the review takes place, which Collins says is standard procedure in these cases.

Little River mom dies in head-on crash in Horry County – WBTW

LONGS, SC (WBTW) -

According to the South Carolina Highway Patrol, a wreck on Highway 90 in Longs was deadly Sunday morning.

The wreck happened around 6:15 Sunday morning near North Myrtle Beach Christian School.

The South Carolina Highway Patrol says a 1999 Toyota sedan was traveling east on Highway 90 when it went into the other lane and struck a Chevrolet Cruz head-on.

The driver of the Cruz died at the scene.  Horry County Deputy Coroner Tamara Willard identifies the driver as Crystal Grizzard, age 27, of Little River.

Grizzard was a mother of 2 young children and was a manager of the Applebee’s in Conway, according friends and her Facebook profile.

The driver in the other vehicle was taken to a local hospital for treatment.

Both drivers were wearing a seatbelt.